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smallmonday:

handful-ofdust:

ladysaviours:

WELL
the first thing to discuss is that Megan Abbott cares very deeply about the teen girls she writes about, but does not let them convince her to write about them sentimentally or one-dimensionally- her characters frequently do terrible things to themselves and to each other, but there’s always a reasoning there that you can understand, and even sympathize with a little bit.
second: she is very, very good at creating a sense of an insular social ecosystem. this is especially true of dare me and the fever (the end of everything is a bit different, because a) it takes place outside the school environment, and b) it largely deals with the girls reacting to things that happen to them, not things they make happen.) but dare me and the fever are both about groups of female friends, and how they interact with each other and what happens when their relationships spiral out of control. her stories are very invested in the girls’ self-perception and how that changes over the course of their relationships- what makes them do the things they do, and how that changes when they discover new things, new power they didn’t know they had. and even in her books where the social system in question is TOTALLY ALIEN to me (suffice to say I was not a cheerleader in high school) she builds the atmosphere of competition and conflict extremely well.
thirdly, the fever is basically about salem and I love reading new takes on salem.
fourthly, femslash.

Sounds legit in all ways. Sold! I’ll probably start with The Fever, though.

Can I barge in and say that if Megan Abbott is to your taste, her earlier novel Queenpin is also terrific? Female mob courier and her female protégé in the early 60s, same vein of characters doing terrible things and relationships spiraling out of control.
Sorry, I just love Megan Abbott and my ears perk up like a fennec fox whenever anyone seems interested in her.


Queenpin was part of that Hard-Boiled Crime series, right? I actually think I might’ve picked it up in the store at one point, but I’ll keep it in mind.

smallmonday:

handful-ofdust:

ladysaviours:

WELL

the first thing to discuss is that Megan Abbott cares very deeply about the teen girls she writes about, but does not let them convince her to write about them sentimentally or one-dimensionally- her characters frequently do terrible things to themselves and to each other, but there’s always a reasoning there that you can understand, and even sympathize with a little bit.

second: she is very, very good at creating a sense of an insular social ecosystem. this is especially true of dare me and the fever (the end of everything is a bit different, because a) it takes place outside the school environment, and b) it largely deals with the girls reacting to things that happen to them, not things they make happen.) but dare me and the fever are both about groups of female friends, and how they interact with each other and what happens when their relationships spiral out of control. her stories are very invested in the girls’ self-perception and how that changes over the course of their relationships- what makes them do the things they do, and how that changes when they discover new things, new power they didn’t know they had. and even in her books where the social system in question is TOTALLY ALIEN to me (suffice to say I was not a cheerleader in high school) she builds the atmosphere of competition and conflict extremely well.

thirdly, the fever is basically about salem and I love reading new takes on salem.

fourthly, femslash.

Sounds legit in all ways. Sold! I’ll probably start with The Fever, though.

Can I barge in and say that if Megan Abbott is to your taste, her earlier novel Queenpin is also terrific? Female mob courier and her female protégé in the early 60s, same vein of characters doing terrible things and relationships spiraling out of control.

Sorry, I just love Megan Abbott and my ears perk up like a fennec fox whenever anyone seems interested in her.

Queenpin was part of that Hard-Boiled Crime series, right? I actually think I might’ve picked it up in the store at one point, but I’ll keep it in mind.
Tags: megan abbott
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antipahtico:

Resurrection ~ Tobias Green

antipahtico:

Resurrection ~ Tobias Green

(via crippled-plaything)

Tags: tobias green
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The Governor’s lies [ 5 / ]

(Source: davidmorrissey, via govnablake)

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the-walking-dead-art:

18 Miles Out

Today in bad post-apocalyptic behaviour: let’s fight like five-year-olds right next to a building full of walkers, and also discharge our weapons at the guy we’re trying to keep prisoner while doing so. It’ll be fun!

(via rickolantern)

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"The main thing for me is that you believe that a man who has done terrible things can do good things as well. A man who is a killer and a mass murderer can actually turn around and show loving feelings. And anybody who has studied any sort of psychology will tell you that is the truth of real life - that nobody is all good and nobody is all bad."— David Morrissey

…oh, you sweet Northern child.

(Source: davidmorrissey)

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thenearsightedmonkey:

Little comics everywhere
danskjavlarna:

"They never saw their child again."  From Simple Hans and Other Funny Pictures and Stories, 1854.

thenearsightedmonkey:

Little comics everywhere

danskjavlarna:

"They never saw their child again."  From Simple Hans and Other Funny Pictures and Stories, 1854.

(via wamato)

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"Hi, I’ve come to talk, and when I say ‘talk’ I mean drink your whisky and snarl ultimatums at the middle of your chest. Anybody ever tell you you’re too damn tall? Also, I hallucinate wildly. If you’re the town drunk, I’m not quite sure what that makes me."

"Hi, I’ve come to talk, and when I say ‘talk’ I mean drink your whisky and snarl ultimatums at the middle of your chest. Anybody ever tell you you’re too damn tall? Also, I hallucinate wildly. If you’re the town drunk, I’m not quite sure what that makes me."

(Source: bethyling, via churchofgrimes)

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From the Variety review (not positive): “[Morrissey and Cohu are] continually having sex but they don’t seem to know how to talk to each other”…this doesn’t necessarily sound like a drawback to me, is what I’m sayin’. Also: that one time when Dr Frankenstein was the Governor’s cross-dressing son. NB: Holy God, Morrissey’s feet are huge.

(Source: 28monthslater, via thegovernorsjester)

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gingerhaze:

The final page of NIMONA is up today. 

Today on NIMONA

Read from the beginning

gingerhaze:

The final page of NIMONA is up today. 

Today on NIMONA

Read from the beginning

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